THE WONDERFUL RUSSIAN DOCTOR

  • Authors: Rybkin I.A.1, Kryuchkova A.V.1, Kondusova Y.V.1, Panina O.A.1, Gridneva L.G.1
  • Affiliations:
    1. Voronezh State Medical University N.N. Burdenko
  • Issue: Vol 12 (2023): МАТЕРИАЛЫ VI ВСЕРОССИЙСКОЙ СТУДЕНЧЕСКОЙ НАУЧНОЙ КОНФЕРЕНЦИИ С МЕЖДУНАРОДНЫМ УЧАСТИЕМ «БЕРЕЧЬ И РАЗВИВАТЬ БЛАГОРОДНЫЕ ТРАДИЦИИ МЕДИЦИНЫ»: ВЕРНОСТЬ ПРОФЕССИИ В ИСТОРИИ МОЕЙ СТРАНЫ
  • Pages: 168-170
  • Section: БЕРЕЧЬ И РАЗВИВАТЬ БЛАГОРОДНЫЕ ТРАДИЦИИ МЕДИЦИНЫ»: ВЫДАЮЩИЕСЯ ВРАЧИ РОССИИ
  • URL: https://new.vestnik-surgery.com/index.php/2415-7805/article/view/9022

Cite item

Abstract

The article is dedicated to the "wonderful Russian doctor", a graduate of the Voronezh Institute, Georgy Fedorovich Sinyakov, for whom human life was the highest value. During the Great Patriotic War, a captured concentration camp doctor did everything to save the lives of soldiers, repeatedly risking his own.

Full Text

Modern life gives people ample opportunities to show empathy so that helping one's neighbor does not become something unusual and complicated. Thanks to new technologies, it is easy for us to see that more and more people are trying to help those in need, do not turn away and do not pass by the disadvantaged, and strive to share with their neighbors. With each generation, individualism is replaced by collectivism, solidarity and caring for each other. People are increasingly remembering that good should be done without hope, without witnesses and without reward…
In 1961, the pilot, the brave "flying witch" Anna Alexandrovna Egorova-Timofeeva, told that her life was saved thanks to the quiet feat of the Soviet surgeon Georgy Fedorovich Sinyakov. The modest doctor had not told anyone before this event about his front-line life, full of events and exploits. Georgy Fedorovich himself noted that he was only "doing his duty" and "victory was not only made in captivity."
For G.F. Sinyakov, the medical profession was a real vocation [1]. After graduating from the Voronezh Medical University, a young doctor Georgy Sinyakov went to the front, where he assisted the wounded until the last, until he was captured. The doctor visited three camps: Borispol, Darnitsa and Kyustrin – a camp near Berlin, where prisoners of war from all European states were driven. Conditions in Kyustrin were inhumanly terrible: Russian soldiers were not provided with medical care, there was a terrible famine in the camp, and with it diseases that killed prisoners with their terrible "claws" for a long time and with pleasure. The news of the appearance of the Russian doctor quickly spread through Kyustrin, and therefore they decided to arrange an exam for him – it was necessary to do a stomach resection. It was said that European colleagues' hands were shaking from hunger and tension, and Georgy Fedorovich acted clearly and confidently, which earned the respect of German executioners and even outside the concentration camp: the murderers began to bring sick people to the captive Russian doctor.
After Georgy Fedorovich saved a German boy who choked on a bone, whose exhausted mother knelt in front of the doctor, G.F. Sinyakov was assigned an additional ration along with free movement around the camp. Of course, Georgy Fedorovich shared rations with the wounded, exchanging lard for bread and potatoes so that the wounded prisoners could eat.
But the exploits of Georgy Fedorovich did not end there. The doctor fought Nazism every day as best he could, and he could do a lot [1]. For example, he invented medicines that helped the wounded, but kept the "fresh" appearance of wounds – this helped the sick to get stronger in order to escape from the camp later. This is exactly how Anna Egorova, the legendary pilot who told the world the story of Georgy Fedorovich Sinyakov, was saved. Sinyakov taught wounded prisoners to imitate death: risking his life, he stated the death of another soldier, whose body was taken outside the Custrin, dumped into the moat, and then the prisoner got out of the embrace of the deadly camp. So many lives were saved.
Georgy Fedorovich can be safely called the righteous of the peoples of the world – such an honorary title is given to people who saved Jews during the persecution. A young Jewish soldier named Ilya Ehrenburg also owes his life to G.F. Sinyakov. The Russian doctor denied the Jewish origin of the guy to the last, risking his life, hid his documents (just as he hid the awards of the pilot Anna Egorova), "changing" the soldier's surname to a non-suspicious one: Belousov. The guy also "died" in the camp, and then "resurrected" and ended the war as an officer in Berlin. A year after the war, a grateful young man sent G.F. A photo of Sinyakov with gratitude for saving his life and for the fact that the doctor replaced the guy's father.
Before the release of Kyustrin, Georgy Fedorovich accidentally found out that three thousand prisoners were going to be shot. G.F. Sinyakov did not hope for success, but he could not do otherwise – he could not abandon his wounded, whom he treated and put on his feet for the sake of life, not for the sake of death…The doctor took an interpreter and went to talk to the Nazis, begging them to spare the exhausted people and let them go. Georgy Fedorovich was respected not only by the prisoners he rescued, but also by the German executioners, whose relatives he treated, despite hatred and pain. Therefore, the prisoners, whose fate seemed to be sealed, left the camp alive.
After the doctor was released from Custrin, he continued to operate and save the lives of soldiers. In 1945, Georgy Fedorovich reached the Reichstag [1]. And after the war, G.F. Sinyakov moved to Chelyabinsk, where he worked as a surgeon, taught at a medical institute. Georgy Fedorovich's students noted his all-encompassing kindness. Only in 1961, after the story of Anna Alexandrovna Egorova, the world learned about the unusual life and incredible feats of surgeon G.F. Sinyakov. Letters addressed to Dr. G.F. Sinyakov flew all over the globe. Russian Russian doctor's letters, through which the warm, living hands of the once-captive prisoners of the camp glided, wrote words of gratitude to the Russian doctor through tears, calling him our "wonderful Russian doctor".
A doctor is not just a profession, it is a real vocation [2]. Difficult times always show the true essence of a person. And the life credo of Georgy Fedorovich could well be the expression "Shining to others, I burn myself," because for this Doctor, with a capital letter, human life was the highest value, and he did everything to save his life, repeatedly risking his own. The fact that Georgy Fedorovich celebrated his birthday on the day of graduation from the Voronezh Institute says a lot, because he believed that he was born when he received a doctor's degree.

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About the authors

Ilya Alekseevich Rybkin

Voronezh State Medical University N.N. Burdenko

Email: ri020299@gmail.com

5th year student of the Faculty of Medicine, L-531

Russian Federation, 394036, Russia, Voronezh, st. Student, 10

Anna Vasilyevna Kryuchkova

Voronezh State Medical University N.N. Burdenko

Email: ann1059@yandex.ru

Director of the Institute of Nursing Education, Candidate of Medical Sciences, Associate Professor

394036, Russia, Voronezh, st. Student, 10

Yulia Viktorovna Kondusova

Voronezh State Medical University N.N. Burdenko

Email: kondusova_yuliya@mail.ru

Candidate of Medical Sciences, Associate Professor of the Department of Organization of Nursing

394036, Russia, Voronezh, st. Student, 10

Olga Alekseevna Panina

Voronezh State Medical University N.N. Burdenko

Email: media01@list.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7351-3638

Candidate of Medical Sciences, assistant of the Department of Organization of Nursing

Russian Federation, 394036, Russia, Voronezh, st. Student, 10

Larisa Grigoryevna Gridneva

Voronezh State Medical University N.N. Burdenko

Author for correspondence.
Email: grilagrig@gmail.com

Candidate of Medical Sciences, Assistant, Department of Nursing Organization

394036, Russia, Voronezh, st. Student, 10

References

  1. Дмитриенко О.В. Умереть, чтобы выжить / О.В. Дмитриенко // Педиатрический вестник Южного Урала. - 2020. - №1. – С. 6-10
  2. Бабченко Е.С., Жукова И.Э., Панина О.А. Личность врача в истории медицины / Е.С. Бабченко, И.Э. Жукова, О.А. Панина // Молодежный инновационный вестник. – 2019. -Т.8, № S1. – C.150

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