The Wonderful Doctor of Bryises Resurrects from the Dead

  • Authors: Azarova A.A.1, Zulaeva K.V.1, Ivanova A.A.1
  • Affiliations:
    1. Voronezh State Medical University named after N.N. Burdenko
  • Issue: Vol 12 (2023): МАТЕРИАЛЫ VI ВСЕРОССИЙСКОЙ СТУДЕНЧЕСКОЙ НАУЧНОЙ КОНФЕРЕНЦИИ С МЕЖДУНАРОДНЫМ УЧАСТИЕМ «БЕРЕЧЬ И РАЗВИВАТЬ БЛАГОРОДНЫЕ ТРАДИЦИИ МЕДИЦИНЫ»: ВЕРНОСТЬ ПРОФЕССИИ В ИСТОРИИ МОЕЙ СТРАНЫ
  • Pages: 278-281
  • Section: СЛЕДУЯ ЗАВЕТАМ ГИППОКРАТА»: ПУТЬ ВРАЧА
  • URL: https://new.vestnik-surgery.com/index.php/2415-7805/article/view/8907

Cite item

Abstract

Relevance. In the history of Russia, there are many famous doctors, nurses, orderlies who, at the cost of their own lives during the war, brought the Great Victory closer. The contribution that each of them made cannot be overestimated, because millions of people were saved thanks to their work. You need to know, remember and be proud of great people in order to inspire yourself to do good deeds and fulfill your professional duty with dignity.
Purpose. To study the difficult medical path of the great surgeon Georgy Fedorovich Sinyakov.
Materials and Methods. Internet resources, interviews. Methods: descriptive, search, analytical.
Results. Georgy Sinyakov was born on April 19, 1903 in the village of Petrovskoye, Voronezh region. In 1928, he graduated from the Medical Faculty of Voronezh University and went to the city of Shakhty, Rostov region, where he honed the skills of a surgeon.
Georgy Sinyakov got into the international Kustrin camp, located near Berlin, in May 1942. Soviet prisoners were not treated in any way and this was the case before the appearance of Georgy Fedorovich. In order to be allowed to work in the infirmary, he had to perform a stomach resection in the presence of local doctors. Being weakened, hungry, with hands trembling from the cold, Sinyakov flawlessly performed a complex operation, after which he took the position of a surgeon in the infirmary and did everything possible to make life easier for prisoners of war. Georgy Fedorovich created an underground resistance committee in the infectious barracks, where escapes were planned. He developed a special ointment based on fish oil, which was disgusting in appearance and smell, gave wounds a purulent appearance, but coped with wound healing with great success [1]. Thanks to this, the Germans had no questions about the death of prisoners. The Germans took out the "dead" along with all the corpses to the moat, from where they "resurrected" at night. Hundreds of lives were saved during their stay in this camp.
Conclusion. Sinyakov Georgy Fedorovich went down in history as an outstanding surgeon and man. His difficult life path is a clear example of the manifestation of perseverance, courage and heroism. While in captivity, Sinyakov saved the lives of more than 3,000 prisoners of war, regardless of his state of health and the likelihood of being killed for organizing escapes. That is, no matter what, he has not lost his human qualities, remaining true to himself and his profession.

Full Text

The Great Patriotic War… Time cannot erase from the memory of mankind the immortal feat of the Soviet people, accomplished in the struggle against fascism, for the honor and independence of our Motherland. Wartime medical workers remained faithful to their profession until the end of their days, rescuing the wounded, helping children and women. They are examples of genuine heroism, fearlessness and self-sacrifice.
The famous commander, Marshal of the Soviet Union I.H. Baghramyan, wrote: "What was done by Soviet military medicine during the last war, in all fairness can be called a feat. The image of a military medic will forever remain the personification of high humanism, courage and dedication."
In such a terrible and bloody time of war, there were those who withstood all the difficulties and remained human. Georgy Fedorovich Sinyakov is an outstanding wartime surgeon who saved the lives of thousands of people.
Georgy Sinyakov was born on April 19, 1903 in the village of Petrovskoye, Voronezh region. In 1928, he graduated from the Medical Faculty of Voronezh University and left for the city of Shakhty in the Rostov region. There he worked for almost 13 years, honing the skills of a surgeon.
The war began... the fascists invaded the territory of the Soviet Union when Sinyakov was 38 years old. On the second day of the war, he was already listed as the leading surgeon of the 19th medical battalion of the 171st Rifle Division on the Southwestern Front. In October 1941, fierce fighting was going on near Kiev, the Soviet army was defeated, and Sinyakov, along with wounded soldiers, was captured, he was caught right at the operating table, and only under threat of execution he left the military hospital captured by the Germans.
In the life of Georgy Fedorovich there were 3 concentration camps: in Boryspil, Darnitsa and Kyustrin. And it was the events of the Kyustrin camp that left an indelible mark on the life of the Russian doctor and the history of the country.
Georgy Sinyakov got into the international Kustrin camp, located near Berlin, in May 1942. He was assigned the captive number 97625, under which he continued his difficult medical path.
The Kyustrin concentration camp was built back in 1940. Initially, it was intended for officers and soldiers from Great Britain, but in 1941 prisoners of war from the USSR began to be brought there [1]. The conditions were unbearable: cold, hunger, bullying. Even Red Cross workers were not allowed to enter the camp where Soviet prisoners of war were, so people were forced to die from lack of food and medicines.
Soviet prisoners were not treated in any way and they had to die in front of others, suffering from pain. It was always like this until a wonderful Russian doctor, Georgy Fedorovich Sinyakov, appeared in the camp infirmary.
In order to be allowed to work in the infirmary, he had to pass an "exam" - perform a stomach resection in the presence of local doctors, one of whom was a Purse. Fascist doctors were convinced that Soviet surgeons were inferior even to German orderlies. But what was their surprise when weakened, hungry, with hands trembling from the cold, Bruises flawlessly performed the most difficult operation [2]. From that day on, he held the position of surgeon of the infirmary (revir) and did everything possible to make life easier for prisoners of war.
Sinyakov, working in the infirmary, received an enhanced ration, which he shared with the prisoners. I exchanged lard for bread and potatoes in order to feed as many people as possible. The doctor, faithful to the Hippocratic oath, operated not only on Russians, but also on Germans. Once he saved the life of a Gestapo man's son when he was suffocating, and none of the Germans could help the boy [2, 3]. And after this incident, the German guards were imbued with confidence in the surgeon -they allowed him to move freely around the camp, enter any barracks, go out to the village and help the people living there. This opportunity became fundamental in the implementation of the underground resistance committee, since Sinyakov could report all the news about the actions of the Germans and plan escapes.
The underground committee was in an infectious barracks, where the Germans were afraid to go. There they planned an escape, taking into account all the little things. The committee consisted of a Soviet surgeon and a German translator, Corporal Helmut Chacher. Helmut Chacher was a communist, knew Russian, so he decided to help Sinyakov. He developed routes, drew maps, took out a compass and a watch [4]. The task of Georgy Fedorovich was the preparation of prisoners and the statement of the death of the "deceased". He taught the prisoners to hold their breath and watch their eyes carefully.
Sinyakov developed a special ointment based on fish oil. It was disgusting in appearance and smell, gave wounds a purulent appearance, but coped with wound healing with great success. Thanks to this, the Germans had no questions about the death of prisoners, because it seemed that they were rotting alive. After making sure of the death of the prisoners, the Germans took them, along with all the corpses, to the moat, from where they "resurrected" at night.
Hundreds of lives were saved during their stay in this camp.
So, the role of the "deceased" was visited by the Soviet soldier Ilya Ehrenburg, who came up with a new name – Ilya Belousov. According to the same plan, he left the camp and ended the war in Berlin with the rank of lieutenant. A year later, he found his savior and presented a photo with a signature, which Sinyakov kept until the end of his days.
Thanks to the Russian doctor, the pilot, Hero of the Soviet Union, Anna Egorova, was saved. Here's what she recalled: "All the prisoners were herded into a column. I was carried on a stretcher, as the dead are carried in a cemetery, comrades in need. And suddenly I hear the voice of one of the stretcher bearers: "Hold on, sister! Russian Doctor Sinyakov resurrects from the dead!". And so it happened, the Russian doctor treated her wounds, disguised them as purulent, so that the pilot was fully strengthened, hid her desk ticket and orders. And in 1945, after the liberation of the camp, she was sent home.
In January 1945, the Germans realized that they had to retreat and gave the order to divide the prisoners into 3 parts: some were sent in echelons to Germany, able to walk - they were driven across the frozen Oder, and the weakened patients, including over 3,000, were left in the camp to be shot. But Sinyakov, instead of running himself, stayed with those who needed help so much. It is still unknown what he said to the German leader, but the Germans left the camp without a single shot! Soon Major Ilyin's tank group arrived there and all the prisoners were released. Thanks to the personal courage and perseverance of Dr. Sinyakov, 3,000 people remained alive [5].
After being released from captivity, the Russian doctor did not leave wounded soldiers, he performed over 70 operations per day. And in May 1945, having reached the capital of Germany with the Red Army, he signed on the Reichstag building!
A year after the end of the war, Georgy Sinyakov was demobilized, after which he continued working in Chelyabinsk, became an assistant at the Department of Faculty Surgery at the Chelyabinsk State Institute.
Perhaps no one would have known about the feat of the Russian doctor if the essay "Egorushka", about the same Anna Egorova, in which she told about the wonderful doctor, had not been published in 1961. After that, this story was printed in all newspapers, and letters of gratitude from Soviet citizens and escaped prisoners began to arrive from all corners of the country [6].
Georgy Fedorovich modestly passed away at the age of 74, and, unfortunately, his feat was not noted at the state level because of the captive biography, but Sinyakov himself always said: "Captivity is a misfortune, a misfortune, but is it rewarded for misfortune? My reward is life, return to family, work, these letters from people I helped in the hour of great grief."

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About the authors

Angelina Alexandrovna Azarova

Voronezh State Medical University named after N.N. Burdenko

Email: lina.azarowa@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0009-0009-6364-8617
https://vk.com/angelinka_azarova

student of the 3th year pediatric faculty

Russian Federation, 10 Studentskaya str., Voronezh, 394036, Russia

Kristina Vadimovna Zulaeva

Voronezh State Medical University named after N.N. Burdenko

Author for correspondence.
Email: kristina.zuleva@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0009-0006-7841-722X

student of the 3th year of the  Faculty of General Medicine

Russian Federation, 10 Studentskaya str., Voronezh, 394036, Russia

Anna Alexandrovna Ivanova

Voronezh State Medical University named after N.N. Burdenko

Email: annaivanova.dr@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5820-2594
SPIN-code: 1504-9664

Assistant of the Department of Propaedeutics of Children`s Diseases and Polyclinic Pediatrics

Russian Federation, 10 Studentskaya str., Voronezh, 394036, Russia

References

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  2. Тимофеева-Егорова А. //Небо, «штурмовик», девушка. «Я— „Берёза“! Как слышите меня?…»./ — М.: Яуза, Эксмо, 2007. — 368 с. — ISBN 5-7117-0074-X
  3. Берггольц О. «… Я говорю с тобой под свист снарядов» / О. Берггольц // Непобедимая легендарная : рассказывают герои событий / сост. : А. П. Нюнько, Л. В. Стариков, А. И. Чусовитина. – М. : Изд-во ДОСААФ, 1968. – С. 198.
  4. Сударов. Б //Звёзды нашей молодости. Эксклюзивные интервью с кумирами ХХ века и рассказы о них / - «Издательские решения», 2020. - 230 с. - ISBN 978-5-44-852195-9

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